Year-End Tune Up For Your Small Business


Ah, December . . .  It’s chock full of holiday parties, events, out-of-town visitors, and shopping.

It’s also when small business owners must get things in order for tax season.

It’s also a great time to take stock of the year that is ending and plan ahead for a successful new year.

Here’s a handy checklist to help you perform a year-end business tune up. No list is exhaustive, yet this list is still pretty long. Adjust it to fit your business needs.

Staffing:

Complete performance reviews for all employees and independent contractors.

Review your staffing needs and plan to add, subtract, or reorganize accordingly.

Review job descriptions for independent contractors to ensure they are truly contractors and not mischaracterized employees.

Review personnel files and update I-9s and W-4s as necessary.

Review employee benefits.

Policies & Procedures:

Review your employment policies and procedures to ensure they are up to date and comply with recent changes in the law.

Review your administrative and business policies and procedures to see whether they accurately reflect your current practices.

Sales & Marketing:

Compare your actual sales to your yearly goal.

Identify successes and areas for improvement in the areas of lead generation and conversion of leads to customers.

Adjust marketing plan to match your goals.

Quality:

Check customer satisfaction.

Review customer service policies and procedures.

Identify ways to improve the customer experience.

Financials:

Reconcile accounts.

Collect W-9s from contractors and vendors that need 1099s.

Review yearly journal or transaction entries for accuracy. Especially make sure that income and expenses are properly categorized.

Verify year-end accounts payable and accounts receivable.

Reconcile payroll including comparing taxes paid to payroll returns.

Prepare documents and files for your CPA or tax professional.

Run year-end reports such as a profit and loss statement, budget report, and balance sheet. Compare to last year’s reports.

Prepare next year’s budget.

IT:

Review IT policies and procedures.

If you collect personal information from customers, review your PCI compliance.

Train employees as necessary.

Install security patches, software, and operating system updates.

Consider getting a cybersecurity audit.

Goal Setting:

Review last year’s goals.

Review your long-term goals.

Set next year’s goals.

Adjust your business plan accordingly.

 

Finally, have a successful new year! 

 

New Federal Law Protects Business Trade Secrets

Pres Obama Signs

On May 11, President Obama signed the Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2016 into law. The Act protects businesses from misappropriation of trade secrets and gives businesses the ability to litigate trade secret cases in the federal courts. The text of the new law can be found here:

https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-congress/senate-bill/1890/text.

Texas adopted the Uniform Trade Secrets Act in 2013. The Texas law is codified in Chapter 134A of the Texas Civil Practice and Remedies Code. The text of the Texas statute may be found here:

http://www.statutes.legis.state.tx.us/Docs/CP/htm/CP.134A.htm.

There are a few differences between the Texas law and the new federal law. The definition of a trade secret is essentially the same under both the federal and state statutes. A trade secret is information that is valuable because it is specific to the business and that the business reasonably tries to protect. Trade secrets typically include a company’s financial data, policies and procedures, customer lists, supplier lists, intellectual property, and other proprietary information such as formulas, techniques, processes, drawings, and the like

The new law allows a business to file a federal lawsuit to protect trade secrets “related to a  product or service used in, or intended for use in, interstate or foreign commerce.” 18 U.S.C. § 1836(b)(1). Courts traditionally interpret interstate commerce broadly, so many businesses will be able to litigate in federal court. One of the most interesting provisions of the new law is a pre-emptive strike: the law allows a party to obtain a court order for seizure of property to prevent the dissemination of trade secrets in “extraordinary circumstances.” The seizure order can be obtained without notice to the opposing party. A prevailing party may get an injunction to prevent dissemination of trade secrets, an order requiring the opposing party to pay a royalty, damages for actual business losses, damages for unjust enrichment, and attorneys fees. The law also allows an award of up to two times the amount of damages if the misappropriation was willful and malicious.

Protecting trade secrets is of paramount concern when a competitor hires a former employee. The Defend Trade Secrets Act allows a court to place conditions on the former employee’s employment when there is a threat of misappropriation.

There are some circumstances when employees or former employees have immunity from disclosing trade secrets. For example, an individual is immune from liability for disclosing a trade secret in confidence to a government official or attorney solely for the purpose of reporting or investigating a violation of law. If trade secrets are disclosed in documents filed in a court, the statute requires the filing to be sealed to prevent public disclosure.

Important: The Defend Trade Secrets Act requires employers to notify employees of the immunity provisions in the law. If your business has incorporated non-disclosure language in your employee handbook, or if you require employees to sign non-disclosure agreements, you will need to revise your handbook or agreements to properly notify employees that they are protected from liability when disclosures of trade secrets are made to government agencies or attorneys solely for the purpose of reporting or investigation violations of the law. An employer that fails to provide the required notice loses the right to recover attorneys fees and exemplary damages.

The availability of both state and federal court actions to protect businesses from misappropriation of trade secrets is a welcome development; however, most businesses need to revise their non-disclosure agreements, handbooks, or policies and procedure manuals as soon as possible to avoid losing valuable rights under the new law.