$47,476 – The Magic Number ARE YOU READY?

On December 1,

new overtime rules take effect.

Is your business ready?

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Starting in December, administrative employees making less than the magic number, $47,476 per year, will no longer be exempt from the overtime provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act. These administrative employees will earn overtime pay if they work more than 40 hours in a week.

 Overtime pay is 1.5 times the employee’s hourly pay rate. The change is huge because it more than doubles the threshold for the exemption. Previously, administrative employees making more than $23,660 a year have been exempt from overtime.

Salary alone is not the only factor for determining whether a salaried employee is entitled to overtime or is exempt. There is actually a three part test:

  • The employee is paid a salary as opposed to an hourly wage;
  • The salary must be at least $47,476 annually for a full time worker to be exempt; and
  • The employee’s primary job must be executive, administrative, or professional, e.g., management, exercise of discretion and independent judgment, or work that requires advanced knowledge.

Otherwise, the employee is entitled to overtime pay at time and a half the employee’s hourly equivalent rate for each hour worked beyond a 40 hour work week.

The Department of Labor has identified four options for employers to comply with the new rule:

  • Raise salaries to maintain the exemption;
  • Keep current salaries, and plan to pay overtime;
  • Adjust workloads and schedules so that employees are not working overtime; or
  • Adjust wages by converting salaried employees to hourly.

What are businesses doing to prepare?

Raising salaries and paying overtime is simply not financially feasible for many businesses. Employees may negatively view adjustments in workloads and schedules or converting them from salary to hourly pay.

There is another way to comply with the new rule without undertaking additional financial burdens: adopt a workplace policy mandating that non-exempt employees cannot work overtime without prior written approval from a supervisor.

Enforce the policy consistently. This will help the business be able to predict and control labor costs while encouraging healthy work-life balance for employees.

Small businesses may have a tough adjustment period ahead.

Adopting a policy regarding overtime, educating employees about the policy, and enforcing the policy will provide some predictability and enable the business to manage workloads in a way that minimizes financial strain and possible cash flow problems. We can help craft company policies that comply with the new rule while providing the ability to manage overtime.

The Business Owner’s Tax Dilemma

Tax time is coming up, and it’s worth taking a look at your business records now so that you are prepared to send your 2016 records to your tax preparer come January.

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It’s also a good time to think about your tax strategy.

Conventional wisdom is to maximize deductions and business losses and to minimize income. While this strategy results in lower tax bills, it may not be the best strategy for your business. Choosing the best tax strategy involves some advance planning and goal setting.

If your personal goals include buying a home or if your business goals include courting investors or seeking funding to meet your goals, then think carefully before minimizing your business income to avoid tax liability.

You may be outsmarting yourself out of your goals.

Mortgage companies tend to view the self-employed as high risk. Self-employed mortgage seekers must jump through more hoops than their counterparts who are employed by large companies. Mortgage lenders want to see a history of income stability. If your small business has taken a loss in each of the preceding several years, it will be hard to get a mortgage.

 The same goes for financing to grow your business. Lenders are looking for credit worthiness and stable income – not a brilliant tax strategy. Don’t let your brilliant tax strategy compromise your ability to meet your goals.

 Have a frank discussion with your tax preparer in advance if your business or personal plans include getting financing in the next 2-5 years.

Time’s A Wastin’ – Get Ready for the New Overtime Rule

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Each year the Texas Workforce Commission and the Wage and Hour Division of the U.S. Department of Labor investigate scores of Texas businesses for violating minimum wage and overtime laws. With the new federal overtime exemptions imminently taking effect, employers should review their payroll policies to ensure compliance. Beginning December 1, salaried employees who make less than $47,476 per year or $913 per week will be entitled to overtime pay for working more than 40 hours in a work week. Texas recognizes the federal minimum wage which is currently $7.25 an hour.

 

Plan now to be in compliance with the overtime rule on December 1. Salary alone is not the only factor for determining whether a salaried employee is entitled to overtime or is exempt:

 

  • Salaried employees are paid a salary not an hourly wage;
  • Full-time exempt employees’ salaries must be at least $47,476 annually; and
  • Exempt employees must have executive, administrative, or professional duties, e.g., management, exercise of discretion and independent judgment, or work that requires advanced knowledge.

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Nonexempt employees are entitled to overtime pay at time and a half for each hour worked beyond a 40 hour work week. The Department of Labor enumerated four options for employers to comply with the new rule:

 

  • Raise salaries to maintain the exemption;
  • Keep current salaries and pay overtime;
  • Adjust workloads and schedules so that employees work no more than 40 hours per week; or
  • Adjust wages by converting salaried employees to hourly.

 

Raising salaries and paying overtime is not financially feasible for many small businesses. Converting salaried workers to hourly pay could tank employee morale. Another way to comply with the new rule without undertaking additional financial burdens is to adopt a workplace policy forbidding non-exempt employees from working overtime without prior written approval from a supervisor. Enforce the policy consistently. This allows the business to predict and control labor costs while encouraging healthy work-life balance for employees.

The last minute has arrived. If you haven’t already adopted procedures to comply, consult a lawyer to help your business transition to the new rule. The Department of Labor has published this fact sheet for employers: https://www.dol.gov/whd/overtime/final2016/general-guidance.pdf

 

Break Room Art A Quick List of Required Postings for Texas Employers

Ah, the employee break room – the smell of stale coffee, long-forgotten leftovers lingering in the fridge,

and… a panoply of informational posters decorating the walls?

Yesterday, the EEOC raised the penalties for failing to post required notices of employee rights under several federal laws.

At issue are the notices covered in the “Equal Opportunity is the Law” poster.

The maximum fine increased from $210 to a whopping $525 per violation.

This begs the question, “What notices are required?”

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All employers must post information regarding:

Additionally, federal law requires federal contractors and employers with 15 or more employees to post the “Equal Opportunity is the Law” poster.

There are plenty of vendors who sell the required posters; however, all required posters can be downloaded free of charge through the Texas Workforce Commission and EEOC websites.

Happy decorating!

Taking A Cue From Business: Using Technology to Help More People With Less Resources

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It’s become ubiquitous on customer service web pages: the chat box.

Searching through a site’s FAQs, a box pops up with an avatar of a person who looks eager to help encouraging you to type your question in the box.

Years ago, legal aid lawyers began wondering if we could use a chat box to help people who lived far away from the nearest legal aid office or who didn’t have transportation to their local legal aid office.

Nationally, several groups started working on the idea.

What if we could leverage internet chat to allow lawyers to help low income people from their desk?

Enter Texas Legal Services Center (TLSC) and the Texas Access to Justice Foundation. TLSC proposed and received a grant from the Foundation to start a chat service. We call it Live Help, and it’s still up and running on the Texas Law Help website, www.texaslawhelp.org.

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The site and Live Help are geared to legal issues faced by low income Texans; however, the site contains a plethora of useful information about Texas law. It’s well worth a visit.

The first chat lawyer, Elliott Fontenette, is now the project manager leading a team of paid and volunteer attorneys. I consider him to be a visionary. When we started Live Help in 2010, Elliott and I were swimming in uncharted water. Now, legal aid groups around the world are using chat to help people access legal information, and the service has proved popular here in Texas with nearly 28,000 Texans having used the service.

I was reminded of my time at TLSC and working on Texas Law Help when Elliott and I were interviewed for a recent ABA Journal article about legal aid agencies that use web chat: http://www.abajournal.com/magazine/article/legal_aid_agencies_are_using_webchat_to_answer_queries/?utm_source=maestro&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=tech_monthly

Thanks, Elliott, TLSC and Texas Access to Justice Foundation for continuing to bring quality legal services to those who cannot afford it. Well done!