Holiday Safety: A Short Checklist

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The holiday season, really from Halloween through the twelfth day of Christmas, is this Austin Business Attorney’s favorite time of year. I love just about everything about the holidays. But, with the good comes the thieves.

Old fashioned thieves and high tech thieves come out of the woodwork during the holidays. From stealing packages off the porch to stealing your identity online, thieves are hard at work during the holiday season.

Here’s a short checklist to help you stay safe.

Personal Safety While Shopping:

  • Be alert to your surroundings.
  • Always lock your vehicle, and don’t leave anything valuable in sight.
  • Take your electronics with you!
  • Don’t leave cell phone, tablet, or laptop in a car.
  • Make sure your devices are locked so you have to use a password to use them.
  • Encrypt your hard drives!
  • Use find my phone or a similar location app.
  • Use an app that will remotely wipe your device if it is stolen.
  • Password protect important documents.
  • Even if the car is locked, Thieves now have devices that ping an electronic device if it’s on so they can easily locate which vehicles to smash and grab. True story: I was at lunch with a friend. As we walked to our cars, we saw two police cars blocking a pickup truck in the parking lot. There were legs sticking out of the driver’s side window. The police had caught a thief red-handed. He and a buddy were driving through parking lots locating vehicles that had laptops in them. They were smashing windows, grabbing laptops, and driving on to the next victim’s vehicle.
  • Carry bags across your body not just over your shoulder and clutch your clutch tightly.
  • Be alert to someone who is standing too close to you in line, they may have a card reader in their pocket – or they may be an old fashioned pickpocket.
  • Give yourself enough time. People make safety mistakes when they are in a hurry.

Safety at Home:

  • Package thieves are following mail and UPS trucks around Travis and Williamson County and are stealing mail and packages before the homeowner knows it’s arrived.
  • Have packages delivered to your work address
  • Ask a neighbor to collect your mail/packages while you are at work
  • Require a signature for package delivery.
  • If your mailbox locks, bravo! If not, make sure you know when the mail usually arrives and try to get it as soon as possible so thieves cannot rummage through your mailbox looking for gift cards and checks.
  • There is a ring of thieves in the Austin area that target neighborhoods and rummage through vehicles in driveways at night. Take everything out of your car at night, and lock it.
  • Lock your door during the holidays both when you’re not at home and at night.

Safety Online:

  • Look for HTTPS or the lock icon or symbol next to the web address before buying online. Thieves could be phishing for your credit card info! The lock icon ensures it’s protected. 
  • Use strong passwords that are a combination of numbers, letters, and symbols and that are at least 8 characters long.
  • Tip: pick a word or phrase that is at least 8 characters long and means something to you, e.g., if you love Christmas, you could choose it.
  • Change at least one letter to a capital (best not the first letter, use one in the middle), change at least one letter to a number, and change at least one letter to a symbol. Done!
  • Example: Christmas as a password might be chr9st#As.
  • Use multi factor authentication when it is offered. That’s a username and password combination plus at least one other piece of information, e.g., a security question.
  • Choose oddball security questions, and use something you make up as an answer. Example, do you remember who your fifth grade math teacher was? Use the question and make up an answer you can remember. Maybe you really wished Batman was your fith grade teacher. So, use Batman. Don’t use your father’s middle name or your mother’s maiden name and the like. Many ID thieves know their victims and know the answers to easy questions.
  • Be careful. Don’t click on anything suspicious. If you receive an email saying your bank account is overdrawn, don’t open it. Call your bank. Never use a phone number you receive in an email. Call the number on a statement, or look up the number.
  • Don’t keep a document on your computer called “Passwords.” I get it, we have too many accounts with user names and passwords. We have to keep them somewhere. Get creative! 
  • One option is to use a password keeping app like One Pass.
  • Another is to keep such a document but name it something that doesn’t alert a thief to the fact that it’s a password doc. Name it something unappealing like colonoscopy or foot fungus, and password protect it.
  • Do NOT under any circumstances keep a hand written list of passwords at your desk or in your bag!

Most of these tips are common sense. Learn to trust yourself.

If you think someone is standing too close, they probably are. Just move away. Go look at something else and get back in line later.

If it’s dark, don’t hesitate to ask a security guard to walk you to your car.

And, if you see an email from someone you don’t know, or if an email seems suspicious, just delete it.

Here’s to a safe and happy holiday season!

‘TIS THE SEASON TO BE SCAM SAVVY

With Thanksgiving behind us, the Holiday Season is in full swing, and so are scams. There may be nothing you can do to prevent the early morning call from your credit card’s fraud department asking if you are buying athletic shoes in London, however there are ways to protect yourself from scams and identity theft.

Here are a few tips for minimizing your risk during the holiday season.

  •  Surf smart. When shopping online make sure you are using a safe site. Take a moment to look for the lock symbol on the screen or “https” in the URL (website’s address). Type in the URL line; don’t click on a link from an email. And, Google has a free service that monitors malware attacks. Type http://google.com/safebrowsing/diagnostic?site= and the website you want to check. You will see a report whether the site has been attacked by malware in the last 90 days.
  • Shop smart. Be aware of your surroundings especially at ATMs and in stores. In the past, pickpockets were the main concern. Someone may still try to snatch your purse or wallet by hand, but now digital pickpockets use technology to steal your credit card information remotely. For a modest investment in equipment, thieves can wirelessly read the information on your credit card’s magnetic strip from a short distance and place the information on a fake card. If your card has one of the new EMV chips in it, you are still vulnerable. The magnetic strip is still hackable, and last summer fraud experts in Mexico found a device on ATMs intended to hack EMV chips. So, how can you minimize your risk? Carry only what you need. If you are going to use one credit card on a shopping trip, leave the rest at home. Most devices work within a short distance – six inches or so. If someone is standing too close to you, move away.
  •   Don’t fall for phone or email scams. All phone and email scams follow a pattern: unsolicited contact, with either a sad story or a fabulous deal, followed by an “Aask.” The Aask takes one of two forms: money or the victim’s personal information. A scammer seeking money will usually request a wire transfer because once started, a wire transfer is extremely difficult to stop. Once completed, a consumer has little hope of recovering the money. Here are a few tips for avoiding scams:
    • If you didn’t initiate the call or email, treat it like a scam. Be cautious, and don’t give out any personal information.
    • If a phone call, don’t guess who it is. Ask, “What is your name?” A common scam begins with a caller saying, “Grandma?” This scammer is betting the recipient will guess a grandchild’s name instead of saying, “Which grandkid are you?”
    • Don’t give out personal information over the phone if you didn’t initiate the call. If you call your bank, they need to verify your identity by asking for information. If you don’t give them information, they cannot help you. A scammer pretending to be your bank, will ask for your account number. Don’t give it.
    • Don’t fall for a fake deal. If you didn’t enter a lottery, you didn’t win a lottery. If you don’t have any relatives in Michigan, it’s unlikely you’d inherit anything from a Michigan resident.
    • Don’t use a phone number or email address given by a scammer. It just goes right back to the scammer. Instead, if you are unsure whether a call is genuine, look up the phone number independently and call back. If a credit card, call the number on the back of the card and ask for the fraud department. If a financial institution, call the number on your statement.
    •  Verify email addresses. If you get a suspicious email that looks like someone you know, look closely at the email address. Scammers fake email addresses by changing one or two letters.
    • Don’t wire money to another country without independent verification. You don’t have the same consumer protections when you send money to another country. A common scam involves an imposter who pretends to be a friend or relative who is stranded in another country. Hang up. Call the person who is supposedly asking for the money. Ask whether they just called you.
    • It’s okay to hang up on a scammer. Scammers are masters of human behavior. They rely on victims to be polite and helpful. The best way to avoid the scam is to simply hang up the phone or delete the email.

Stay safe, and enjoy the holiday season!